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Where oh where can the Mac updates be? ()

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by Dan Moren

Even before Tim Cook took the stage, there was little expectation that this year’s Worldwide Developers Conference would focus on anything other than software. But now, with it in our rearview mirror and a new iPhone announcement likely not far down the road, questions have turned to the future of Mac hardware.

Rogue Amoeba co-founder Quentin Carnicelli stirred up some discussion this past week by examining Apple’s current Mac lineup, and pointing out that, with the exception of the new iMac Pro, none of it has been updated in over a year. (The most egregious case being, of course, the Mac mini, which is closing in on four years without a revision.) That’s prompted some clamor that Apple should commit to yearly updates of its computer platform, just as it does with the iPhone.

There are a few things that have probably conspired to bring the state of Mac hardware to the point that it’s at now. Perhaps what we’re seeing is a perfect storm: a confluence of events, any one of which might impact a model or two in Apple’s product line, but which, when combined, put us in the current situation.

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tingham
2 days ago
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I thought for sure Dan was going to posit that a large percentage of the hardware folks at apple had transitioned over to mobile and the lag we're seeing is them trying to re-allocate and spin up meaningful groups that are actually qualified to make the sorts of decisions required to fix what's wrong.
Cary, NC
sirshannon
2 days ago
I assume that's your theory?
tingham
2 days ago
I mean it's completely uninformed (for the most part ) but if you think about how consistent the mobile division has been able to churn out new hardware; that talent had to come from somewhere right?
sirshannon
2 days ago
it's definitely my theory. Hardware, software, services, mindshare, fucks given... all on iOS (unless you count "thin and light" as a product).
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Nintendo and Microsoft team up in surprising Minecraft ad, Sony left out

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Sony’s cross-platform decision is looking worse and worse

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tingham
3 days ago
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I'm not playing Fortnite or Minecraft much any more at all but I feel like what's happening here is reason enough that; when the next generation of consoles release, there might not be a way for me to play Naughty Dog or Santa Monica games in this house. This makes me incredibly sad.
Cary, NC
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All Apple Park employees getting standing desks because ‘sitting is the new cancer’

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One of the things we learned during David Rubenstein’s interview of Tim Cook, posted in full yesterday, was that all employees at Apple Park are getting standing desks.

We have given all of our employees, 100%, standing desks. If you can stand for a while, then sit, and so on and so forth, it’s much better for your lifestyle.

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tingham
6 days ago
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Geek Desk gets my vote.
Cary, NC
JayM
10 days ago
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Atlanta, GA
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Terry Gilliam Has Lost the Rights to The Man Who Killed Don Quixote

io9
2 Comments and 4 Shares
Adam Driver and Jonathan Pryce in The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.

Well, this is a strange new chapter in one of the strangest stories in modern film. For decades, famed genre director (and former Monty Python, uh, snake) Terry Gilliam struggled to make The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, his own surreal take on the classic Spanish novel. He succeeded, finally, with a rendition starring Adam Driver, and the film premiered this year at Cannes Film Festival.

Except, uh, apparently Terry Gilliam just lost the rights to it. Yes, that’s correct: as reported by Screen Rant, the Paris Court of Appeal just ruled in favor of the film’s former producer, Paulo Brancho, who sued for rights to the project on the grounds that Gilliam made the film illegally.

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According to Branco and the production company Alfama, which he owns, Gilliam and his crew did not hold the rights to make the film. As quoted by Screen Daily, Branco said:

The film belongs in its entirety to [the production company Alfama Films]. The film was made illegally. It’s the first time I’ve ever seen so many people embark on a mission to produce and exploit a film, without holding the rights. It’s a unique case.

Gilliam will also pay a little over $10,000 in damages to Alfama Films, and the company will be seeking similar recompense from the film’s production crew and the Cannes Film Festival.

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So that’s it, then: Terry Gilliam does not own The Man Who Killed Don Quixote. Will the embattled film ever get released? Will Terry Gilliam get his revenge? Will someone tell Don Quixote that those are just windmills? Who can say. I certainly can’t: this story is wild.

[Screen Rant]

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tingham
6 days ago
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Because this is the real entertainment that Gilliam meant to craft all along. The films are just a byproduct.
Cary, NC
satadru
7 days ago
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WTF
New York, NY
sirshannon
7 days ago
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On the Sad State of Macintosh Hardware

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Quentin Carnicelli:

At the time of the writing, with the exception of the $5,000 iMac Pro, no Macintosh has been updated at all in the past year. […]

Rather than attempting to wow the world with “innovative” new designs like the failed Mac Pro, Apple could and should simply provide updates and speed bumps to the entire lineup on a much more frequent basis. The much smaller Apple of the mid-2000s managed this with ease. Their current failure to keep the Mac lineup fresh, even as they approach a trillion dollar market cap, is both baffling and frightening to anyone who depends on the platform for their livelihood.

Compare and contrast with the iPhone, which is updated not just annually, but predictably. Post-WWDC, I’ve had a few friends and readers ask whether they should just go ahead and buy a MacBook or MacBook Pro now — knowing they’re old, knowing the keyboards are of questionable reliability — or wait until fall. I have no idea if new MacBooks are coming in the fall though. It certainly seems like they should, but would you really be surprised if we don’t see new MacBooks (and iMacs) until 2019?

I’d really love to see Apple get Mac hardware on a roughly annual schedule, even if most years they’re just speed bumps, like they were a decade ago.

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satadru
9 days ago
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And this is also why there's a 90% chance that my next machine after 15 years of Apple laptops will be a Chromebook. It's not just that Apple hardware has stagnated, though a large portion of blame there is rightfully owed to Intel, but that there's just not any software any more that makes one NEED a mac. The average user is only using a web browser, and the best in class browser for non-mobile devices, Google Chrome, works on any platform. If you're in publishing and you need the Adobe Suite, then maybe Apple over Microsoft. Microsoft Office? I suspect the 95% use case doesn't require anything more than Google Docs.

What Apple has done is consistently pushed the bar in their hardware with good trackpads and good displays, especially with the shift to HiDPI screens and wider color gamuts... but the last several generations of laptop keyboards have been lacking, so that's a mark against the newer devices.
New York, NY
wreichard
9 days ago
How are we going to create mobile apps and graphics when there are no desktop OSes left?
satadru
9 days ago
I see some sort of hybrid system where one can run hybrid desktop and mobile apps side by side. For instance, ChromeOS is enabling linux app support, alongside Android app support. I imagine it is going to be nice to run your IDE on a touchscreen computer with a keyboard which you can also run the app you're developing on. Hell, even Autocad is now available as a web app.
wreichard
9 days ago
Well, I guess the iPad Pro has beaten the MacBook in some tests, so maybe ...
tingham
10 days ago
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I'm typing this share with comment on my Windows 10 PC that absolutely destroys my trashcan mac pro in every single benchmark except for "Dark Mode."
Cary, NC
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wchw25
10 days ago
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Word.
Singapore, Singapore

The No-Mayo Pasta Salad That Will Change Your Mind About Pasta Salad

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Pasta salad borrows from Italian peperonata.
Pasta salad borrows from Italian peperonata. Photo by James Ransom

‘Tis the season for pasta salads. They’re a summertime staple at picnics and backyard barbecues for good reason: They can be prepped in advance, feed a crowd, and hang out for hours. Most importantly, they’re easy-breezy, exactly what a dish on a hot summer day should be.

Except that, in reality, pasta salad is often the most snoozeworthy dish on the picnic table—bland, mushy, oily, heavy, or all of the above. It’s the dish that we bypass entirely or shuffle to the sides of our plates after a few bites to make room for the things we actually want to eat.

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tingham
10 days ago
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Sweet banana peppers, sundries tomatoes and hoagie spread on cold tortellini. Bbq favorite.
Cary, NC
MotherHydra
10 days ago
I'd go back for seconds.
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